Michael Ruhlman’s two: Salt

So the second technique you are to master is the use of salt. And it’s true. After all, salt is the mineral that brings the flavors up, intensifying their power and strengthening their taste. And there’s also the fact that it used to be so valuable that Romans were paid in it. Salary, from the latin salarium, in salt.
What Mr. Ruhlman reccommends is to add salt along the procedure, tasting each time, instead of waiting and adding it all at the end. This way the salt will intensify individual flavors when they are still on their own, and bring them together instead of trying to intensify them all at the same time, probably with haphazard results. In order to prep my hand in this technique I revisited Bill and Haley’s Butternut Squash soup. However, instead of just adding salt once I added salt when I was frying the onions.

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When I added the squash

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And after blending.

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I did add all the other spices when the recipe indicated it. I am not an expert on the taste of butternut squash, so I don’t know if its flavor was intensified. However, the taste of the cinnamon and the nutmeg was much more noticeable this time. Maybe it’s working!

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